Skip to main content

The source

Last few months have been a real test of patience and humility for many residents of Motithang in Thimphu as they struggled with limited or no water. Some tenants were seen carrying water in various jerrycans from the neighboring apartments.

Our people are helpful that way. Some tenants had to keep their big buckets and cans outside to collect rainwater for all their bathroom needs. Most residents kept quiet and went about their normal businesses. Water supply is still is erratic and people wonder when life would be back to normal again. 

Some house owners complained about the issue to the concerned authorities. They were made to understand the shortage is from the source. And to their surprise, officials were saying that the water source is gradually drying up and that supply would never be consistent, hereafter. That worried tenants. I am sure house owners panicked. 

"We had no water problem for as long as we remember; it's only after some new in-charge took over that the problem has surfaced." I cannot authenticate the claim, but people certainly have the right to express their doubts. 

It's funny though. You see, no two buildings (located just right next to each other) face the same issue. And that makes us suspect that there more than one source. Otherwise, how can one building have water and not in the other? Wait, this get more interesting. Realizing this inconsistencies, an affected house owner calls the person in-charge. He gets the same response - the problem is from the source. But he has done his homework and found out it was only in his building that there was no water while others have no problem. Only then the in-charge agrees to "find out". That night water flows again. 

Water is essential. It's a basic human need. In fact, the section 5(c) of The Water Act of Bhutan, 2011, says, "Every individual shall have access to safe, affordable and sufficient water for basic human needs." Therefore, shortage is not an an excuse. How can we solve the issue? How carefully do we manage this precious resource? Are our people informed on the sustainable use of water? 

How do we then ensure consistent water supply to all residents? While having private players is one possible options, in another post I suggest adopting a system whereby we can pump up river water to be stored in huge reservoirs strategically placed and then redistributing from there to the households. Such water can be used to wash clothes, flush toilets and clean our houses. That way we reduce the burden on the already limited resource. 

And rainwater go untapped, too. 

(Pictures by Dorji Wangchuk)

Comments

  1. Like we often joked, the world would laugh at us if we say we have water problem, while letting fresh water river flow down to India just like that.
    But I think the mega project is almost completing. Somewhere in Chari a big dam is said to be done to solve all the water problem for once for all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hopefully, that would solve all our woes. But again that will depend so much on well we manage it. It is human tendency to overlook its importance when something is in abundance. The authorities should strongly implement The Water Act and make our resources more sustainable than the way we currently manage them.

      Delete
  2. Perkenalkan, saya dari tim kumpulbagi. Apakah Anda berencana untuk mengoleksi files menggunakan hosting yang baru?
    Jika ya, silahkan kunjungi website kami http://kbagi.com/ untuk info selengkapnya.
    Di sana anda bisa dengan bebas share dan mendowload foto-foto keluarga dan trip, music, video, filem dll dalam jumlah dan waktu yang tidak terbatas, setelah registrasi terlebih dahulu. Gratis :)

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

So what do you think?

Popular posts from this blog

Our throw-it-away culture

Like all grandparents, my late grandma would call food 'tsampa rimpoche' and any fuss made about it would invite everyone's sneer and scoldings. Food is always treated with respect and is never wasted. "If you waste food in any manner," she would admonish us. "One day food will discard you and you will go hungry." 
What remained from the previous meal would be turned either into porridge or sometimes leftover rice would be dried in the sun. The dried rice would then be fried into puffed rice and consumed with cups of suja. When there was so much food left, especially during big events, leftover rice or kharang would be mixed with a small amount of yeast and brewed into ara.  
The only thing that I can vividly recollect from my primary school days is how we would be hungry most of the time. Food we were served was hardly enough to tickle our throats. We would be sent home only once a week on Saturdays and that was our opportunity to replenish our popcorn s…

Utpal Academy - Bhutan's first All-girls High School

Welcome to Bhutan’s first all-girls school. Isn’t that wonderful news to all our parents? Certainly, as a parent of a one-year old daughter I am excited about the coming of a school exclusively dedicated to the needs of girls. Our girls need special treatment, which we can for sure entrust the responsibility to Utal Academy, Paro.
I really like the name – Utpal – in Buddhist world, Utpal is another name for lotus flower, which is believed to grow from mud and yet blossoms into a beautiful and majestic flower. It stands for purity and many deities are depicted holding flower Utpal, more prominently Jestusn Dolma, the Goddess Tara. Symbolically, it also stands for the transformation of our girls. What an apt name for the school!
The Principal’s message posted on the academy’s website promises providing our young women an “opportunity to participate fully in a wide range of extracurricular activities to develop skills and qualities that will lead to successful and fulfilling life.” That’s…

Bloggers are not journalists

To say bloggers are not journalists is to say oranges are not carrots. Bloggers are not journalists. That’s true. But can bloggers become journalists? Maybe. Can journalists be bloggers? Yes. In fact, it would be only proper and appropriate for journalists to blog their opinions as opposed to being 'politically' correct all the time. So why call oranges carrots when they are what they are?
Well, it is true – bloggers have no training in journalism. That’s why they are bloggers. And for the same reason they are  not journalists. No bloggers have ever claimed what they blog can qualify as ‘journalism’.  We all do what we love the most and give our best in whatever we are doing either reporting news or blogging. 

Journalists do it as careers. Bloggers do it (mostly) for hobby and out of passion. Most journalists also do it with great passion - that's true. The journalists get paid for doing their jobs while bloggers derive pleasure doing it. Journalists cover (report) stories eve…