Skip to main content

That in Other Words

Rural-urban migration is a good indicator of many things gone wrong. People just do not leave their ancestral homes without solid reasons. 

In Bhutan there is an old proverb, which goes rang yue zampai woglu inru ga (རང་གཡུས་ཟམ་པའི་འོག་ལུ་ཨིན་རུང་དགའ།) – one would love his/her village even if it is located under a bridge. And that says a lot. People just don’t abandon their homes without concrete reasons! 

And some of us blame these people as if most we are born and bred here altogether. I think when people make that big move of abandoning their ancestral homes and leave for cities, they will have thought a lot about it. People just don’t leave their homes! 

My grandmother, after spending many years in the city, with her sons, and daughters and grandchildren, two years ago, decided to go home in the village. That is where her heart really is although half her children and almost all her grandchildren are in the city! 

That goes to show how most of us are here in this so-called towns with no choice.


A field free of wild animals would mean the farmers would be able to harvest all that they have grown and reap the benefit of their hard work. On top of being able to feed their families, they would also be able to earn additional income from the sale of their surpluses. But this is not so. As if wild animals have a stake in the farmers' crops, they come in time and eat and plunder everything grown in the fields. Where is the hard work? What is the use of feeding wild animals?  

So, you see, people leave their villages for reasons! 

Today, in some pockets of rural Bhutan, farmers are provided with electric fencing. I find that as one of the most effective solutions to solve the problems of crop predation by wild animals in our rural villages. Electric fencing powered by solar will help a great deal in fighting this menace. And just like the farmers, animals would thrive in their rightful places. 

That's one of the many solutions to curb the menace called Rural-Urban migration. 

Note: Pictures by my former classmate Tshering Tobgay, Teacher at Shingkhar Primary School, Zhemgang

Comments

  1. One reason why people leave their ancestral home is... relying everything on the government has reaped nothing in some parts of Kheng. The electric fencing you mentioned here is mostly from NGO's like the Tarayana Foundation. Otherwise, you know the oblivion of the word 'Zhung'-Government.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I spent 7 years of my professional life in Zhemgang. It is still more remote than urban. Now roads are being connected to every Chiwog. Good and happy for the people of kheng. This should have been done years ago because sometimes I doubt the credibility of the development minds that development comes to districts in alphabetical order. No wonder Zhemgang began with the 26th letter in the English alphabet. People in towns and cities rejoice with no concern...just try and ask when was the last time they made a visit to their villages...people are unsure of even the year they made the visit. Sad disgrace!

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is a nice post... it's true most people stay near there ancestral place... I do find people are leaving home, looking for bigger and then come home... xox

    Thank you for the very kind commenrs on my blog, they were very sweet ♡

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

So what do you think?

Popular posts from this blog

Bloggers are not journalists

To say bloggers are not journalists is to say oranges are not carrots. Bloggers are not journalists. That’s true. But can bloggers become journalists? Maybe. Can journalists be bloggers? Yes. In fact, it would be only proper and appropriate for journalists to blog their opinions as opposed to being 'politically' correct all the time. So why call oranges carrots when they are what they are?
Well, it is true – bloggers have no training in journalism. That’s why they are bloggers. And for the same reason they are  not journalists. No bloggers have ever claimed what they blog can qualify as ‘journalism’.  We all do what we love the most and give our best in whatever we are doing either reporting news or blogging. 

Journalists do it as careers. Bloggers do it (mostly) for hobby and out of passion. Most journalists also do it with great passion - that's true. The journalists get paid for doing their jobs while bloggers derive pleasure doing it. Journalists cover (report) stories eve…

The Story Thief

When we were growing up in a small village in the central Bhutan, we would gather around our grandparents every evening in a room that would be dimly lit with a kerosene lamp. Our grandparents or the elderly members of the family would then take turns to entertain us (siblings and cousins who lived under the same roof) with their stories. Such was the only form of entertainment we had had then.  
Our grandparents would start their stories, which they probably would have heard them from their grandparents. A young poor boy becomes a successful farmer by a turn of luck, a man fights a bear, a poor boy accidentally marries a rich man's beautiful daughter, a lame monkey helps a boy find great wealth, a rooster regrets his action after he mistakenly accuses his wife and young men go on business trips to buy cattle, among many others. We grew up listening to many such stories. Sometimes, the storyteller would narrate the same story again and again, and yet every time it sounded more magi…

A 'holiday' for meat vendors

This Bhutanese month (May 16 - June 13) is observed as Saga-Dawa, a holy month in the country. It is popularly or infamousely known as the time when the sale of meat items is banned in Bhutan. And it's also an opportunity for us to put a light brake on our mighty meaty appetites. Consequently, restaurants are encouraged to serve their customers rich vegetarian meals during the period. Similar ban is also observed every first month of the Bhutanese calendar.
But going by what's happening, the saga-dawa is a month long mandatory and government sanctioned holiday for the butchers and meat vendors. Being holy month does not really make a difference to the menus in the restaurants from rest of the  months in the year. 
Meat is available in all the restaurants and even small eateries ensure that their customers are served their favorite dishes. They're only being wise and practical because if they don't serve meat their customers would move to the restaurant next-door that ser…