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An alternative solution to Babesa Sewage

From: The Journalist 27.04.2014
Recently, I shifted my family a little closer to Thimphu city from where I used to stay. The new place is an excellent location and in a good neighborhood. It now plays host to the corporate office of a bank, many automobile showrooms and some schools. But Babesa has an issue - it is an old issue at that. As I write this a gust of wind is blowing through my windows carrying with with the famous Babesa scent!  

When I passed by that area, years ago, I must admit that the odor was beyond toleration point. Today it has become friendlier - we only get some occasional doses when the wind blows or hot sun shines. We were informed that the Thromde officials are treating with some chemicals. But one should understand - nothing can stop the smell. Years ago, when these tanks were dug out, we were also told, that the officials assured the residents that these tanks would be fully covered and promised no foul odor. And years later residents are still complaining and whining.  

Back then, the area did not fall on the highway. It was paddy fields and farms. There was no plan of the highway - so called Expressway - and its coming turned agriculture activities in that area into a thing of the past. And today the highway goes through that place, uncountable buildings have come up. 

It is encouraging to know that the officials are concerned, too. They should be. And we all are. We need ideas to solve this problem. I was thinking about it for a long time now and even blogged it in jest. Can't we turn our waste into wealth? And I see a company in the UK that turns "human waste" into cooking gas. Instead of putting the money provided by ADB into building another set of sewage tanks (like the ones we have Babesa stretch), can't we think of installing such device that would turn human waste into wealth? I am sure it will cost us fortunes, but I think it would be worth exploring it. 

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