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Do we see it happening now?

Photo: Penstar Collection
One of the pledges that People’s Democratic Party (PDP) made was to do away with the Pedestrian Day or No Vehicle Movement Day. Will DP live up to their pledge? 

When it was first implemented the move invited a lot of criticisms from all quarters. People argued that the move instead of helping our environment contributes more pollution as it results in traffic congestions in other places while the core town remains empty during the day.

Back then it was once a week on Tuesdays. The government in response to increasing criticisms made it once a month – on first Sunday of the month! It was far better, but many people were still unhappy with the policy.

PDP used this public outcry as indicator for change. Many people (who were against the policy) were relieved knowing that No Vehicle Movement Day will be no more when the general election result was declared!
  
Now that PDP is in power – instead of doing it away with it totally, I think it would be really good if we can have it once a year. We must observe it in a manner that would be fit to be called a No Vehicle Movement Day! This way we can add value to the World Environment Day. If we need to draw attention of the outside world, I see it happening now. 

Can we do it once a year in a grand manner and make it purely a no vehicle movement day be it in the core town or the peripheries! Vehicles must remain parked throughout the day – nation wide that day! This can be one big public event and maybe even declared a public holiday.

Do we see this happening? With a government that promises to listen to the people I am optimistic that this dream would turn reality! 

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