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Hitting the bull and getting to the point

Wait, I am getting to the point
I like being short. And many will agree that my sentences are usually short. Maybe that's also to do with my physical stature. When things are short, they come clearer and distinct to me. Normally, I am not so much fan of long, long sentences, but sometimes I am sure they are unavoidable. And we have no choice but to read them anyways. Maybe that's to do with my limited vocabulary too. 

Maybe that's to do with my inability to handle complex sentences. But for me simplicity is the key. When you write something, it is to let your readers understand what you want to say. It is never to confuse your readers. The simpler it is, the better the chances of getting your messages across (my assumption at least). Of course fancy sentences and complex ones at that, are irresistible, but again we think of our readers. 

This morning, I was looking up for some information on publishing in Bhutan. And that took to BICMA's door. That's how I stumbled on BICMA ACT (you should read it when you have time, I feel it is important for all. Here is the link: http://www.bicma.gov.bt/ACT/English.pdf). I might have looked it up several times in the past, but I was ashamed to have missed the preamble - which by the way is one sentence - I was wondering how they could wonderfully write a preamble in just one sentence. That's really something. I quote it below for your record. 
An Act to provide for a modern technology-neutral and service sector-neutral regulatory mechanism which implements con- vergence of information, computing, media, communications technologies and facilitates for the provision of a whole range of new services; to implement new information and commu- nications technology (ICT) and media policy, particularly to emphasize the Government’s priority to information, comm- unications and media industry, as an industry in itself and an important enabler for other areas of human activity, thus pro- moting universal service to all Bhutanese, especially in the remote and rural areas of the country; to facilitate privatization and competition in the establishment of ICT and media facilities and services; to encourage and facilitate investment in ICT and media industry; to give new statutory authority to the Ministry of Information and Communications over several new activities in the ICT and media industry; to make the existing regulatory body more capable and independent regulating all aspects of ICT and media industry; to realign and separate responsibilities of the Government and the regulatory body; to make provision for the effective use, management and regulation of radio fre- quency spectrum; to regulate ICT and media facilities and services with a view to facilitate fair competition among all players, both in the public and private sectors; and to ensure effective use of national ICT and media infrastructure and resources; and to encourage and facilitate an increased use of ICT for new e-services and to effectively regulate the activities related to cyberspace and media operations, including their unwanted contents.
That was quite something, isn't it? 

Note: This is not to make or pass any comments to anyone or any authority or the persons behind the work. But out of sheer admiration and awe, I have quoted it here. And I will only regret if the authority mistakes my intention otherwise.  
 

Comments

  1. Perhaps who ever wrote that preamble should learn that the "brevity is Soul of wit"


    ha ha ha Interesting observation.........

    ReplyDelete
  2. Nice Observation sir!
    Shorts are always sweet!...:)

    ReplyDelete
  3. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Nice one! I wanted to say the same thing but PSN had written it already. Cheers:)

    ReplyDelete
  5. can you share some tips on writing sentences. Short sentences.

    ReplyDelete

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