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If you Stone Sherubtse College


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I have been following Kesang Choden, an emerging women activist, on her quest to dig out the fathers of the children born out of wedlock especially in the east. It is a serious issue, one that merits the national attention. If we don’t start now, it will be too late. People who have “planted the wild seeds” (to borrow the phrase from the activists) must be taught a lesson. And for the same reason, I have volunteered to be the first Sherubtsean to test my DNA for the coming up of a DNA Bank and I am ever willing to support the activists for this noble social cause.
 
For the last so many years, these mothers have suffered in silence. Now it is time to finally reveal the identities of those hiding “fathers”. This can be the Judgment Day. Unidentified fathers have come thus far without a tinge of guilt whatsoever.  

And especially having gone through this experience of never having a man to call a “father” I can easily connect with those children out there. I understand their feelings inside out. I don’t know how it feels to have someone called father at my side. I have tried through fiction, but so far my attempt at fiction writing is without much result.

I understand many Sherubtse graduates must have left their legacies in the villages. Some may have done it deliberately while others may have committed the blunders without realizing that they might have fathered some children in the locality.

The point is to get at those people who have shunned their moral responsibility. I agree when the activists talked of identifying fathers and asking them to pay money for the years that they have neglected their children. It is a good way to apologize the mistake.

But Sherubtse is an institution. Lyonchhen does not own it neither does it belong to Home Minister. It is not handed down to the Education Minister through his ancestral heritage. For that matter Sherubtse is the not the property of the Members of the Parliament or government or ruling or opposition party or National Council. And over the years it has produced finest human beings who today excel in all spheres of life. It is sad that the college authority failed to respond to this threat. 

As an alumnus I will not feel comfortable sitting back and watching people throw stones at College Gate.  This is to plead people behind the campaign to refrain from carrying out such a stupid act. Otherwise we will be forced to sue whoever dares and bring responsible people to justice. As some people pointed out, the activists should come up with some sensible ways to deal with the matter.

There is no point in throwing stones at the monkeys when the bear has eaten the maize. Aim at the right target!

Comments

  1. A thoughtful post! I second your views, sir.

    ReplyDelete
  2. No body is perfect in the world.. but you are the perfect and inspering writer in this website i can say.....you bring a thoughtful provocking article.
    Keep it up sir, Though i am working as driver in Bhutan Power Corporation limited under 400KV Transimmision line Punatshangchhu-II.i never miss to read any article you have posted in WAB. I love to read mostly your article. I have learned so many thing from your article how to write article.i am simple writer in nopkin nick name as(Kezwaa)...i like to write and read most of the time. All the best of luck in what ever you do in future.
    Kezang Dawa(Driver)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hmm..looks like the blame is on the institute which is not what kesang might have thought. Fatherless child are prevalent everywhere and just as you graduated from sherubtse doesnt mean you are liable to blame. I did complete from the same college but that doesnt mean i was into that breeding spree! Honestly, it looks like the gun is pointed to the graduates(according to your post)..while kesang tried to sensitise the general issue via sample study in kanglung. I dont take it an issue to taint any alumni from sherubtse.. Just a thought..:)

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm with you Penstar sharing similar sentiments.

    ReplyDelete

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