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When Dawa Dema went missing

Dawa posing for me
Last night she went missing. This made me restless. I could not imagine her being in the streets when it is very cold outside. The thing about winter in this border town is that it gets deep into your bone and you have so much pain afterward. I did not want her to be out in the dark at that hour when no one was on the road. I worried that she might get trampled over by the speeding trucks.

The realization that I have lost her forever made me cry. And I cried my heart out. Just as she came I lost her, I repented. I might have behaved rude with her sometimes but I have always taken good care of her. When she refused to eat anything last time, I panicked and became restless. She would not even feed on milk.

But losing her forever was something I never expected. I was broken hearted. Crying didn’t help me. When sleep finally overtook me, I dreamed terrible, illogical dreams, which I often dreamed when I was under so much stress. I thought it was only natural.

And this morning I woke up early as my mind was not at rest.

As she walked in from the other room, I lifted her in my arms and almost danced in sheer joy. “Where were you?” was what I could say.

Note: It has been almost three months since Dawa Dema entered into our lives and she is about four months old and has become my daughter's favorite in the house. In fact she has captured our hearts.  

Comments

  1. Oh yes, i can understand how u feel man. It actually happened to me too, I called her Zamin.:) When she came back the next day, I made her promise never to leave me again. I tied a Sungkey around her neck so tht evils do not separate us. I love cats.

    U reminded me of my cat, she died two years back. :(

    PP

    ReplyDelete
  2. Nice one. i also do love cats. :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi,
    You made me to remember my Cat, his name was Che-po. I used to take him whenever I travel faraway places.
    What is so unfortunate is I lost him when my family and I were half way to Gelephu as he jumped out of the car suddenly. We tried hard to look for him but in vain. Even during my return I tried to look for him but he is gone, gone forever from our family.
    The only thing I could do is to pray for his healthy and warm life at this time of the year.
    Cheer.

    ReplyDelete

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