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Please meet my Grandma

Still going strong
"My grandmother, like everybody's grandmother,  was an old woman," writes my favorite author Khuswant Singh. Of course that's a crude way of describing one's grandmother, but I am sure he meant it well when he wrote that line. I find it so funny and can't get over with the expression.

My grandmother is 87-year young (I borrow the term from Bhutan Youth). She is blessed with a long and happy life. She gave birth to a dozen children of which only eight have survived. 

She is a living example of love, compassion and generosity and was loved all back in her village. Always willing to help others, her neighbors remember her for exemplary kindness. As a grandson, I might lie to you, but there are people who know this is the truth. It is comforting to know that she is here with us and still going strong although she complains of a series of body aches and numerous pains. It pains me so much to hear her talk of such pains in her frail body. But I realized that's all I could do. 

But it has been almost a few months since she went to Gelephu to stay with her youngest daughter. My daughter misses her as much as I do. And I am happy that she would be coming soon. Last time when I talked to her, she broke down and between the sobs, she told me that she missed my family. It meant so much to me. I consoled her. But the moment I ended the call, it was my turn to cry. I miss her and it was my wife's turn to wipe my tears. 
      
One morning she walked into my room and told me that I should wake up early and go for jogging or just walks. "People who sleep like this won't even be good at archery," she warned. Back then I was so busy preparing a bow. That was like hitting the nail on its head. But I am yet to catch the early worm. Maybe with the coming of another new year, it is not totally gone from my wish list. 

Come back home grandma. And may the Buddha grant her prayers!  

Comments

  1. Long live Grandma. She really looks young and elegant. You have some traits of looks inherited from her but of course not so as good looking as her.

    You are a lucky fellow. Best wishes to her.

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  2. You are fortunate and lucky to have such a great Grandma - still going strong. Your write-up reminds me of my Grandma who put me back to school although she did not survive to see the fruit of her labor. This brings me tears but it is a good reminder that she be thanked from time to time as her very act has made me what I am, "a self reliant individual" I suppose.

    Long Live Grandma.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you Porky and Quinza. Appreciated your comments so much.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I want her to score a century...i pray for her health and long life...nice photo of our beloved aila!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Nawang, its so endearing to read such as an article in dedication to your Grandma. May she live longer and healthy.

    ReplyDelete

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