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"How Can I be a Good Citizen?"


This is an essay my brother wrote for a competition organized by Kuensel Corporation in the beginning of the year and I was so happy that he won in his category. This is his own words and I am glad he gifted me a soft copy and the right to reproduce it here for my readers. And since my blogging colleagues are posting their prize winning entries, I don't have any. Thus I take a little help from my brother. Please enjoy.

Being a good citizen is not different from being a good son, a good student, a good friend, a good neighbour and a good person. A good citizen also knows about our culture, national dress, language and our natural environment. A good citizen is kind and respects old people.

In order to be a good citizen, I shall be a good son. I shall obey my parents and follow their advice. I shall keep away from bad habits and demonstrate maturity every time I go home. I shall make my happy parents proud.

In order to be a good citizen, I shall be a good student. I shall work hard and obey my teachers. I shall abide my school rules and make good friends. I shall help keep my school surrounding clean and read good books to increase my knowledge of the world. I shall obey our seniors and guide our young friends. 

In order to be a good citizen, I shall be a good friend. Good friends make us good persons. They stop us from doing bad things. I shall be kind and understanding and good example to my friends.

In order to be a good citizen, I must be a good role model. As an educated person, I shall share my knowledge on environment, health, hygiene, causes and prevention of diseases in the village. I shall motivate children to go to schools. But to be a good citizen, it is important to be kind and caring person who respects old people and be kind to others.

Therefore, I shall be good son at home, good student at school, role model in the village, a valuable friend – a good person in general and be a good Bhutanese citizen. 

By Thinley Samdrup
Class IX 

Comments

  1. hey aue, this is well written. congrats to your brother.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your brother's article is very nice one. Keep encouraging him to write. Like big bro like younger one!

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  3. A nice essay your bro. Keep encouraging so that we can see the second Penstar some day who is in the making...:)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks Lotey, Rikku and Langa. I will convey the message to my brother, who I am sure would be really happy to hear that you all liked it. Kadrinchela.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The Idea is great.....congrats to your brother :)

    ReplyDelete

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