Skip to main content

Convocation - from blues to madness

Pema, Karma and Sonam - Proud products of Sherubtse
Here is another news from RUB. This time about the University Convocation. This maybe the first time when all colleges under RUB would be summoned for their convocation together. It would be one big event because some colleges have students who have graduated 8 years ago.

Usually for colleges like Sherubtse, convocation happens once every two years. It was an event of their lifetime for graduates back then. But now it is going to be nothing far from a result declaration day that happens a primary school, where students of all classes gather together to receive their results.

Convocation is a special moment and we want to make it count; definitely not by dumping every Dorji, Dawa and Dema from different colleges in a room. This is where less means more...

It would be better if individual colleges take the honor of organizing their own convos and make them annual event if they so much care about expense. Maybe this is the first symptom of RUB going autonomous.

  

Comments

  1. Yea Ngawang, its too disapponting :'( :(..have been really looking forward to it all these 3 years n now...and lo and behold, we became the experimental mice here. Lets see how far RUB can do in this experiment.

    BTW the 3 chaps- Pema, Karma & Sonam looks nice in the pic above :D

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

So what do you think?

Popular posts from this blog

Alive and kicking

This feels like ages since I last posted anything here. That shows how inactive I have become on my blog. It is such a pain to let it go empty, day after day. And I am sure that all bloggers share the same sentiments.

I have attempted to blog about something for a long time now, only to find myself failing to do so. Maybe that is my laziness. But sometimes, there is nothing new or interesting to blog about. Topics are crucial. As far as my idea of blogging goes, a post cannot be a mere record of personal events - everyday affairs - although there can be blogs about such topics and interests. For example, the one I am writing now - has nothing about anything in particular,  besides citing some personal excuses.

Bhutan is going through yet another interesting era in that we have just had our third parliamentary elections and the new government is in place. I take this opportunity to welcome the new government and a new set of cabinet members, the speaker of the National Assembly and th…

When they are ready

The Ministry of Education discovered 890 'underage' children admitted in schools across the country in 2019. Thus, the ministry in May 2019 issued a notification revoking the admission for these children. Majority were in urban centres. 
Desperate, parents and the affected schools requested the government to intervene. They also requested the government to consider lowering the enrolment age to five years. Currently, in Bhutan a child can legally go to school only when s(he) is six years old. 
And that policy was strictly followed a few years ago to the extent that some schools refused to admit children even if they were short of a few weeks. So, parents, mostly in urban areas, resorted to faking their children's ages. Many parents were guilty of adding years onto their children's actual ages. However, most parents, we are told, managed to correct their 'mistakes' later. Faking a child's age was rampant both in government and private schools. But the story wa…

Our throw-it-away culture

Like all grandparents, my late grandma would call food 'tsampa rimpoche' and any fuss made about it would invite everyone's sneer and scoldings. Food is always treated with respect and is never wasted. "If you waste food in any manner," she would admonish us. "One day food will discard you and you will go hungry." 
What remained from the previous meal would be turned either into porridge or sometimes leftover rice would be dried in the sun. The dried rice would then be fried into puffed rice and consumed with cups of suja. When there was so much food left, especially during big events, leftover rice or kharang would be mixed with a small amount of yeast and brewed into ara.  
The only thing that I can vividly recollect from my primary school days is how we would be hungry most of the time. Food we were served was hardly enough to tickle our throats. We would be sent home only once a week on Saturdays and that was our opportunity to replenish our popcorn s…