Skip to main content

This is where we are now

In Greek mythology, Sisyphus is a king punished to roll a big boulder up a hill. He puts so much effort to roll the boulder up the hill, but as soon as it reaches the top, it rolls down to the bottom of the hill. And the king has to roll it up to the top of the hill only to see it rolling down to the base of the hill. The whole rolling up and rolling down process starts all over and goes on. For eternity. How monotonous can a task get! How futile an effort! What a waste of energy! And where is the charm in such an existence?
  
Today all of us are engaged in a Sisyphus-like task and just like him we take so much pride in doing that. Every day, we go to office. We start our computer and log on. We browse the Internet and update what’s happening at home or on the way on facebook walls. The more we update it, the more it needs to be updated. I won’t be surprised if slowly people start updating what’s going on in their bathroom onto their facebook walls.

And then we all sit down and start complaining of hundred and one things. We complain and condemn unfair laws. We are cowards, afraid of our voices. We write nasty complaints targeted at an individual or organization on online forums. We borrow others’ opinions and express as our won with pride of having launched a rocket in the sky. And a few would agree. Others would attack and curse the anonymous complainant. Everyone has different things to say about the same thing; except that it essentially means the same thing but said in hundred different ways.

We talk of how tall someone is or how short others are. We gossip who has worn what at some elaborate weddings. We complain about our jobs and we complain about our bosses, good or bad. We talk of how in inefficient our colleagues are (hinting how good we are) and start gossiping about politicians. We talk of businessmen and pass our readymade comments on our celebrity figures. Some say we don’t have any such figures in Bhutan. We have only our mighty egos to be blamed. At the end of the day we have nothing much to talk about. At meetings and congregations, we say so many things and don’t even mean quarter of it.  

Our conversations are scripted and we are certain of what is coming next.
“How are you doing?”
“I am doing fine, thank you!”
“How is your family?”
“My family is doing well, thank you!”
“How is your work?”
“My work is going fine, thank you!”

And sometimes the order is reversed whereby the one who asks questions now becomes the one to answer them later. “Oh so you are going home?” we ask, meeting someone on his way home. “So, you are going to the hospital?”we ask on meeting someone on the way to the hospital. “You are eating your lunch now?” is our question on seeing someone eating his lunch. The list goes on. And last week I was having a haircut at a barber’s when one of my friends spotted me. “You are cutting your hair?” was what I got.  

For the first time in years I realized my body was calling in for some exercise and heeding that call, I went on a late Sunday morning walk. It turned out to be more than a walk. It made me think of deeper thoughts. So, as I am walking on this long stretch of footpath that never seems to end, I meet a man, who carries an umbrella in his hand. I am told that’s his only prized possession. And he as walks, he talks to himself. For a while I mistake him for talking on his mobile phone. Now and then he laughs aloud, but abruptly his mood goes solemn. He continues talking and soon finds reasons for laughter. I tell myself, this no ordinary man.

In the next moment, he walks closer to a rivulet. He immerses his legs and slowly wades through the water. Reaching the other side, he talks to himself for a while and starts crossing the water again. I watch him with curiosity and disbelief as he crosses the river many times. Crossing the water back and forth multiple times gives him so much joy or at least relieves him of unspoken concerns or so I suppose. He talks and communicates with the unseen, beyond normal human perception. I see him as a man who has crossed our level of existence.

In our pursuit of materialism, human web of connection is weakening. We are dissociating from ‘others’. We don’t know who lives in the next door flat, but we try to add as much friends on facebook. And there is no consolation and solace whatsoever. We believe less and less in the power of prayer and many are condemned as superstitious. On the other hand we whole heartedly take pride in “Who has viewed your profile” or who has liked our facebook status. And this is where we are now!

P.S: This piece was published in Bhutan Times May 8, 2011 edition.

Comments

  1. how did Sisyphus become a king, if he was so foolish! He could have dug a hole on the top of the hill and place the boulder in there or just roll up some smaller boulder to support the big one... ophhh... what a king!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

So what do you think?

Popular posts from this blog

We killed our Golden Goose

One of our most significant events this year is that of Bhutan’s exporting of eggs to India. A few years ago, we were importing them – in truckloads. This goes to show that we have the potential to grow and progress as a country, provided we put in a little more effort and work harder. Did you know, Bhutan today has 422,648 hens and produces 251,678 eggs a day? 
In July 2016, Bhutan Agriculture and Food Regulatory Authority (BAFRA) banned the import of chilies from India reasoning that the laboratory tests conducted confirmed presence of pesticides. And right there was our opportunity to grow on our own. The news was like winning a lottery and it sure was a boon to many a Bhutanese chili growers, as they now had ready market san competition from cheap chilies from across the border.

Then came the ‘off season’. That is when the price of chilies unreasonably shot up as high as Nu. 300-400 per kg. It was unreasonable and daylight robbery, many people protested. And then people took to the …

Can we build energy-efficient houses?

Before we know it, it is winter again! Almost! 
And like all winters this winter will be unforgivingly cold. Of course, some people think winter cold is far less severe than the extreme summer heat the likes of which you experience in Phuentsholing or Gelephu. The reason they give is that while you can dress in cool and warm clothes in winter to beat the cold, the summer heat has almost no solution. Being naked does not help. Fair argument, I must say, but some people who can afford air conditioners in their homes might argue that the answer to the summer heat is in installing the equipment. 
But I think the answers to both the extreme summer heat and unbearable winter cold rest with the energy efficiency of the buildings we live in. 
Rooms in some of our apartments are unusually tall that in order to change a fused electric bulb requires you to literally climb onto two or three tall tables stacked onto each other. It takes three to four solid men or women to hold these tables in place; …

A Vibrant Village

What is a vibrant village? What does it take to create one? Can a village vibrancy prevent and curb rural-urban migration?
A village is vibrant when it has happy and content people. A village is vibrant where content people help each other. A vibrant village is where everyone is involved in or concerned with building a strong community. Such a village is connected with a well-maintained road that provides farmers with access to the outside world. 
A vibrant village grows its food and has no need to import anything from outside. Such a village booms with economic activities and here farmers look beyond subsistence farming. That is not to inject greed; it is rather, to encourage hard-working people to work harder. These farmers have at their service useful and modern farming tools to ease their work on the farms. In a vibrant village, farmers have the right to harvest their crops without having to share them with wild animals. 
A vibrant village has adequate and modern day facilities. Ele…
01 09 10