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A Bundle of Joy

Technically, I am just eight months old. Although I was born much earlier than that, I was born again on the morning of August 29, 2010 at around  10.05 AM with my little daughter in Phuentsholing General Hospital. And seven months later, she could utter Apa, making me the proudest father on earth. I am sure happiness is relative and all fathers feel the same way about their children. There is a proverb in our locality that says in our eyes, our children look the best while others' crops appear more productive. How true! And unless we are parents ourselves, we don't appreciate what it means being parents. Having children of our own to raise makes us appreciate our parents more and be extra grateful to them. 

It makes me happy to see my daughter learn new things everyday. Every time I go to office, she has learnt to wave her hands and say "Tata...". And people say she is going to have power in her words because she has learnt to say apa first, I don't know. Well, that maybe a stereotyped belief, I would of course be happy to have fathered a daughter with a powerful speech at her disposal. Here are a few pictures.  
















Comments

  1. she is sweet..:)........
    i think i know a reason behind her calling "APA' first.....

    wife teach child to say "Apa" or "daddy" or "papa" first so that during the night when child cries out calling "APA"..she will make you wake up saying, "Our daughter is calling youo, darling.."....lol

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  2. Haha...I hope not Sogyal. But my wife envies me for our daughter chose to call me first. Thanks anyways for dropping by. Appreciated.

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  3. Very soon, you gonna celebrate her first birthday. So don't forget to write her wishing message in our blogs before the day begins celebration. we will be eagerly waiting to see her birthday cake in dady'd blog. she is so sweet and cute. Proud to be Dad!

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  4. Thanks Jamyang. I will keep in mind to do that. Yeah, keep bloging man.

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  5. So happy to see her pictures. Your bundle of joy indeed.

    I can't wait to see my daughter call me, 'Ama.'

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  6. Enjoy ur moment with ur daughter now because this moment wont last forever... u ll be amazed to see how fast the kids grow...@Penstar and Kuenza.

    It seemed just yesterday that I was holding my daughter in my arms and today she walks by my side like a friend :)

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  7. Thanks Kuenza and Madam Sangye for running through my post. And I am enjoying every moment of my fatherhood.

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  8. Apa, I share the same joy here, and there in Thimphu Kunza is feeling no less. I am happy to see her pictures. Here I am always waiting for the 8th period to finish so that i can run home and take my angel on her regular walk... she is speaking strange word, may be I should consider documenting those fine creations and send to DDC, since they seems in fail in creating words.... Yes, tata, apa, ...are first works my angel spoke too... I am loving it!

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  9. PaSsu, my brother told me that children are the ones who invent new words -- thus the new addition of words in our language. I mean if we want to give a name to something, we must take the children's help, not give some high-sounding fanciful, difficult-to-remember name. You definitely should document your moments with your baby.

    I'm writing a letter to my daughter every few days. It is already 61 pages. I started before she was born.

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