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Beyond Alphabets

Blessing me with her wisdom; my daughter
It is nothing new. I am trying to teach English alphabets to my almost three-month-old daughter. She did well. On the first day, she could utter only a few vowels, but the progress has been good.  A, E, and O are her favorite alphabets. There are a few alphabets she purposefully refuses to say aloud with me. There are many, but I want to talk of only one today and give my interpretations. The letter C. From the look of her eyes, she is clearly disgusted. And I am sure you will mock at my assumptions, but as a father, I have a right to interpret my daughter’s wisdom.

It has been there ever since the beginning; as old as the mankind. Naturally, it is human tendency to think of someone who does a little good things to us or speaks kindly of us, we think he/she is a nice person. And everyone has weakness to nice persons. All family members and friends are nice people to everyone. Obviously nice people are to be treated well. And when you are a person in a high position, you have people looking up to you, all nice people, your friends, family members and relatives. All these people expect you to do good things to them that might somehow benefit them now or in the near future.

But it is against the moral conscience of man to favor one set of people over another. Again, it is quite a human tendency to help your near and dear ones. You just did the right thing by giving your cousins some jobs. You just did the right thing by letting your nephew write a selection exam even when he has already received the answered questions in advance. You just did the right thing by taking the road to this part of the geog because all nice people in the village live there including your own parents. You just did the right thing by offering some cash to a man of power because now your daughter has a comfortable job to take care of her livelihood.

My daughter has had the chance to be ride cars on her way to her routine injections. And she has consented to get a ride in a cab because being nice person she understands her father’s position. She understands now her father has to pay extra money to get the same car and buying a used car contributes to air pollution. 

This is at the time when the entire world is talking about combating climate change and global warming. And when such talks are going on this side of the globe, some people are making millions from their industries and factories while others make millions by the very act of organizing such events. Well, talking helps, but blabbering without action is a sheer waste of energy. People look forward to such summits for they take them to foreign lands, where they will be treated like saints to star rated hotels. Our approach to climate change may not have changed at all. Some of us make living by talking on fancy topics.

Comments

  1. I am not guilty. I earned my job. Nobody was nice to me because I came from a village. My kids will earn theirs too.
    I am guilty when it comes to secondhand car. i was being wise.
    I fall among the group you described last:"talking on fancy topics"

    Nice read. Check if your daughter can say "Uncle PaSsu"

    ReplyDelete
  2. A three year old daughter seems much wiser than a seasoned 60 year old bureaucrat. May be because as we get older we tend to get ourselves more closer towards our near and dear ones, and ignoring the others, thus polluting the pure mind. May your daughter possess all the wisdom that she have today.
    nice read la.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Satirical again. I loved this but can you please keep Yoebum out of your satires. Lol...
    I am not guilty of any of the above.
    Amusing as always.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wow! your daughter start learning alphabets now...that is great and i would say that you are good Dad fro her.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Nice one, Penstar. A satirical piece, but very thought-provoking.

    ReplyDelete

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