Skip to main content

Herd mentality of some sort

How creative are Bhutanese people when it comes to generating new ideas to start new business ventures? It is an interesting and debatable topic. Of course there are so some creative Bhutanese who choose to differ from the mainstream. For instance, I am still fascinated by small company that cleans up water tanks or delivers LPG cylinders to the customers’ doors. There are people who make homemade soaps. All these tell us that we are capable of creating creative business ideas.  

Photo: Google Images
But by nature we are safe players. We do not risk being different. That’s why I think we have our young graduates competing for civil service posts.  Of course now that notion is gradually changing. Our business depends on what our neighbors are doing. We want to sell doma even when there are hundreds who sell the same goods in the locality. We open restaurant that caters to same group of people with same menus. We want to start mineral water plants even when there are already many established companies in the same business. We want to import same clothes from Bangladesh; same furniture sets from Bangkok, same culinary and toiletry items from Nepal and other countries alike that the next door shop is selling. 

And lo see even doma-sellers around the country follow the same rules – they are to sell 4 small pigeon-excrement-like betel-nuts for Nu.5. That’s the standard rule applied in Phuentsholing as of July 2010. I am sure it is even less in the capital city. Well, that’s the forces of demand and supply, says an economist. And they complain there is no business. In business sometimes we gain and sometimes we face loss. But that’s okay. Adding a doma khamdo or two in a doma-pack won’t necessarily make you poor and likewise it would never make you rich. At the most you will gain some loyal customers, ready to buy doma from you and recommend a hundred more to your shop. And here is one thriving business.     

Likewise look at the apple-sellers of the Paro and Wang valleys. They are too impatient. They have started transporting apples to the border towns even before they are fully ripened. But if these farmers have allowed these fruits to hang onto their branches, a few more days, the business would have been more lucrative. But there is only our herd mentality to be blamed.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Bloggers are not journalists

To say bloggers are not journalists is to say oranges are not carrots. Bloggers are not journalists. That’s true. But can bloggers become journalists? Maybe. Can journalists be bloggers? Yes. In fact, it would be only proper and appropriate for journalists to blog their opinions as opposed to being 'politically' correct all the time. So why call oranges carrots when they are what they are?
Well, it is true – bloggers have no training in journalism. That’s why they are bloggers. And for the same reason they are  not journalists. No bloggers have ever claimed what they blog can qualify as ‘journalism’.  We all do what we love the most and give our best in whatever we are doing either reporting news or blogging. 

Journalists do it as careers. Bloggers do it (mostly) for hobby and out of passion. Most journalists also do it with great passion - that's true. The journalists get paid for doing their jobs while bloggers derive pleasure doing it. Journalists cover (report) stories eve…

A 'holiday' for meat vendors

This Bhutanese month (May 16 - June 13) is observed as Saga-Dawa, a holy month in the country. It is popularly or infamousely known as the time when the sale of meat items is banned in Bhutan. And it's also an opportunity for us to put a light brake on our mighty meaty appetites. Consequently, restaurants are encouraged to serve their customers rich vegetarian meals during the period. Similar ban is also observed every first month of the Bhutanese calendar.
But going by what's happening, the saga-dawa is a month long mandatory and government sanctioned holiday for the butchers and meat vendors. Being holy month does not really make a difference to the menus in the restaurants from rest of the  months in the year. 
Meat is available in all the restaurants and even small eateries ensure that their customers are served their favorite dishes. They're only being wise and practical because if they don't serve meat their customers would move to the restaurant next-door that ser…

Utpal Academy - Bhutan's first All-girls High School

Welcome to Bhutan’s first all-girls school. Isn’t that wonderful news to all our parents? Certainly, as a parent of a one-year old daughter I am excited about the coming of a school exclusively dedicated to the needs of girls. Our girls need special treatment, which we can for sure entrust the responsibility to Utal Academy, Paro.
I really like the name – Utpal – in Buddhist world, Utpal is another name for lotus flower, which is believed to grow from mud and yet blossoms into a beautiful and majestic flower. It stands for purity and many deities are depicted holding flower Utpal, more prominently Jestusn Dolma, the Goddess Tara. Symbolically, it also stands for the transformation of our girls. What an apt name for the school!
The Principal’s message posted on the academy’s website promises providing our young women an “opportunity to participate fully in a wide range of extracurricular activities to develop skills and qualities that will lead to successful and fulfilling life.” That’s…