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Homemade Masters Degrees

For the first time in the history of the country, Bhutanese people can now pursue their Masters degrees at Sherubste College, the country’s first premier college. According to the news released by the college, it proposes to start offering Masters in English, Economics and Mathematics. Good news to us all. We should be proud of it because this shows the level of confidence the college has attained. And we are really proud that the college has dared to take this initiative. Congratulations to the college administration and Royal University of Bhutan for daring to dream thus.

Hopefully, now most Bhutanese aspiring to upgrade their qualification can do so without having to go far from their families. Those that have gone abroad should be in a position to share with us how inconvenient it is being away from one’s family members. But now that problem will be solved.

But when most of our people are unwilling to get their Masters from India, will our people be ready enough to take chance in studying in our indigenous college? This is because when we think of Masters, in Bhutan we talk about the corresponding financial returns. I guess this must be it everywhere in the world. The fast rule is, the further you go away from your homes and family, the more lucrative the venture becomes. That’s why today we have hundreds competing for a slot or two to study on foreign soil. What will be the financial returns if one avails homemade degrees? And we are going to hear that kind of questions a lot. When I can study abroad and bring home some dollars, why would I choose to sit here and go home empty-handed?  

Again it all boils down to the question of qualification versus monetary returns. I think if I can upgrade my qualification, I am also indirectly upgrading my social position and thus the financial returns. However, my concerns would be whether our home grown college is equipped to deliver courses that are challenging and are of international standards. Does the college have the required and qualified manpower? If the answers are affirmative, then for me it would be like going home.

For now, looking at MA (English) course modules, it looks like old wine being poured into new bottle. Would I want to waste another two years sitting there listening to the same stuffs all over again? Or do we have someone to delve in-depth this time?

No offense is intended at any institutions. All beginnings are apprehensive. For now, daring to dream is good enough and time will take care of the rest.

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