Skip to main content

Khegpas in the 21st Century?

Finally, we have a story in Kuensel on this much talked about topic that sends goose bumps to parents. And the same fear haunts people from Kurtoe to Kalikhola, from Zobel to Zurphey, and from Chokhor to Chapcha. It is definitely more than a rumor. It is worrying everyone secretly. To believe or not to believe is an issue here. I think it is a rumor, but then rumor of this scale should have some truth in it. On the other hand the number of hydro-projects in Bhutan is increasing. I am divided now. I want to ignore the news at all, but when the fire is burning the entire hill you can’t have peace standing on the top of that mountain. I am human first. And I fear losing my brothers, sisters, and relatives everywhere. It is really worrying.

A few days ago, I read the same on Kuenselonline.com readers’ forum. Most agree Khegpas are for real while others think it is a big bullshit. I like that man’s courage. One went on to say that we live in one big superstitious society and that such beliefs are hindrance to social progress. He hit the bull’s eye. We live in the 21st century. And if Khegpas are walking the length and the breath of our country in search of human heads, it is a serious cause of concern. It is Bhutan’s problem and the authorities should intervene. Concerned authorities involved in these projects have the duty to explain clearly to us because we don’t understand what is happening.  

While some might apparently be creating unnecessary fear amongst the people, the concerns raised by villagers make sense. Some mischievous people might be taking the advantage of innocent villagers. And some mishaps are bound to happen if this trend continues.

But it is encouraging to hear people in Kurtoe are taking the matter into their own hands. Therefore, we just have to wait for them to catch red-handed a khegpa or two. And if they are successful in their mission, these Khegpas should be called on BBS Live TV to explain and admit to the entire nation why they did what they did.

But for now, let’s keep our fingers crossed and pray for our village siblings’ safety. 

 (Photo: Kuenselonline.com)


Comments

  1. There were a lot of "Missing children" announced on BBS TV lately, and it is unclear whether they were found, if not what has been done about it?
    I always wanted to write something about it but worried if it was even allowed!!!!! It is forbidden, almost! For the first time the ice was broken by a news media and thanks Ngwang for taking it to a new height.
    If it is a rumor then there are people who could clarify and give peace to the people of Happiness Country. If not we should know what the law is doing against it? or are they allowed to chop human heads just like that?

    My logic says strong steel and good cement over good engineering will make good structures and not human heads!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

So what do you think?

Popular posts from this blog

Our throw-it-away culture

Like all grandparents, my late grandma would call food 'tsampa rimpoche' and any fuss made about it would invite everyone's sneer and scoldings. Food is always treated with respect and is never wasted. "If you waste food in any manner," she would admonish us. "One day food will discard you and you will go hungry." 
What remained from the previous meal would be turned either into porridge or sometimes leftover rice would be dried in the sun. The dried rice would then be fried into puffed rice and consumed with cups of suja. When there was so much food left, especially during big events, leftover rice or kharang would be mixed with a small amount of yeast and brewed into ara.  
The only thing that I can vividly recollect from my primary school days is how we would be hungry most of the time. Food we were served was hardly enough to tickle our throats. We would be sent home only once a week on Saturdays and that was our opportunity to replenish our popcorn s…

Utpal Academy - Bhutan's first All-girls High School

Welcome to Bhutan’s first all-girls school. Isn’t that wonderful news to all our parents? Certainly, as a parent of a one-year old daughter I am excited about the coming of a school exclusively dedicated to the needs of girls. Our girls need special treatment, which we can for sure entrust the responsibility to Utal Academy, Paro.
I really like the name – Utpal – in Buddhist world, Utpal is another name for lotus flower, which is believed to grow from mud and yet blossoms into a beautiful and majestic flower. It stands for purity and many deities are depicted holding flower Utpal, more prominently Jestusn Dolma, the Goddess Tara. Symbolically, it also stands for the transformation of our girls. What an apt name for the school!
The Principal’s message posted on the academy’s website promises providing our young women an “opportunity to participate fully in a wide range of extracurricular activities to develop skills and qualities that will lead to successful and fulfilling life.” That’s…

The Story Thief

When we were growing up in a small village in the central Bhutan, we would gather around our grandparents every evening in a room that would be dimly lit with a kerosene lamp. Our grandparents or the elderly members of the family would then take turns to entertain us (siblings and cousins who lived under the same roof) with their stories. Such was the only form of entertainment we had had then.  
Our grandparents would start their stories, which they probably would have heard them from their grandparents. A young poor boy becomes a successful farmer by a turn of luck, a man fights a bear, a poor boy accidentally marries a rich man's beautiful daughter, a lame monkey helps a boy find great wealth, a rooster regrets his action after he mistakenly accuses his wife and young men go on business trips to buy cattle, among many others. We grew up listening to many such stories. Sometimes, the storyteller would narrate the same story again and again, and yet every time it sounded more magi…