Apr 9, 2010

They investigate

Of course there is nothing that would offend anyone here. We have seen with our own eyes and heard with our own ears. In Bhutan whenever there are accidents or forest fires (which is becoming more rampant now, especially in the east), or some other mishaps, reports flood the columns of newspapers. And as the norm has it, these reports will tell us what has happened where and quote some witnesses who might have accidentally been at the scene. I am not sure even if they talk to people at the site. But let’s say they do and I am sure they ought to. And as you might have realized all these stories end with the catchword: “…and the police are investigating.”
And even after so many months and years, they would still be “investigating”. Yes, of course we should understand their limitations too and I am totally in support of these brave men and women in uniforms.

But last week they really did “investigate”. We all were pleased, couldn’t believe is the word. One of our colleagues woke up to see his laptop and mobile phone gone from his house early one morning. The last option left was to call police and lodge his complaints. He gave out specifications at the main gate. And when he received a call from the cops, he was surprised. He claimed the lost gadgets as his own. He even didn’t care who the culprit was – having his things back was enough. Policemen-on duty that morning did a wonderful and vigilant job. I don’t know how they did that. I wish they can do that with forest fires. I wish they can find out who dumped a dead body in a river. I wish they can find out who vandalized a chorten or robbed a house. I really do.  

But good work policemen.

Only ask your uncle chief to do away with ata-system because RBA has already stopped the system. And it was he who has boldly proposed this humane act to the nation much to the appreciation of the society and policemen in general.