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These Snobbish Women


The other day I was having lunch with my wife. And seated next to our table was a group of five women.  Sitting near them was an experience of a lifetime. Generally, I have a lot of patience. But I was kind of impatient the other day. It was terrible nightmare. For the first time I felt like I was in a fish market. These women could really talk and talk loud, so loud that if they are at Sangaygang, people in Semtokha would hear what they were talking. 

They won’t care even if the Prime Minister of Bhutan was in the same room having lunch, forget us. We even didn’t exist in the room. I felt like a ghost. They would laugh as if their armpits were being tickled by thousand fingers at once. Don’t get me wrong here – I am not a misogynist, have never been one and never will be in future. Like all men I like women. But everything about these ladies was irritating. They ignored the fact that they might be disturbing other people for there were so many customers. They behaved as if the hotel was their house. I wonder whether they talk likewise even at home. I better visit doctors today and get my eardrums checked.

 They would go on talking about their husbands openly as if they were spreading Buddha’s wisdom to a crowd of faithful followers. God, I didn’t know some women can be this intolerable. We thought we would better leave, but we had already ordered something. That means we were trapped there. We had to listen to all the craps these snobbish women were talking. I have observed these behaviors in some western sitcoms and movies. 

I better run to the hospital now, but hey, don’t forget to say NO to VIOLENCE against WOMEN! In fact all forms of violence!

Comments

  1. Ha ah ha ha I have to read it again some time later. I want to make some comments but I also need to be correct politically. YOu are one hell of an observer. Give me some time and another read before i give my peice of mind!

    ReplyDelete
  2. My sympathy for the nuisance they have done in your lovely outing.

    Ha haa,man but its really interesting to go through your article (but there is bit exaggeration).

    I like the last two sentences and always hold on to it.

    Good weekends ahead!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ha ha, Tharchen finds my account of talking women "a bit exaggeration". Lol. I don't think I would do that. And nowhere have I exaggerated a bit. In fact I have left out one more facts: these ladies only speak in English - seems they don't understand Dzongkha. Excessive learning does that I guess.

    And PaSsu, thanks - I am waiting for your "politically correct" comments.

    ReplyDelete
  4. welcome to Delhi and iwill take you to my college to see how much indians talk with their crappy things.
    it will be worse than these ladies

    ReplyDelete
  5. well well... Excessive learning and noisy women huh.. Well, from what I know is, a learned woman doesn't stoop to this level to be heard.. Just say, there are exceptions in the society: Attention Seekers !!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. haha. Nice.

    As much as I love women I too think they can be very sick at times.
    But your complaint just reminded me of how the Nopkins make a ruckus in the restaurants, which is why we prefer fooling around at private recidences. Gosh, they must talk the same thing about us too.

    But yeah, lets not stop conveying message on non-violence against our fairer sexes.

    ReplyDelete

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