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A Magazine Dream


I thought I would start a magazine. I talked with an uncle of mine, who was all 'yes, yes' with my idea. We have prepared a business plan and thought of the editorial board. We sought business ideas and suggestions from across the border. We have contacted publishers as far as Kolkata and Delhi. Days have gone into naming the magazine. And Druk Outlook was born.
Almost a year on, many new magazines are circulated in a small Bhutanese market.  Of course that is something we all can be proud of. But our brain child Druk Outlook is yet to see the light of the day. Everyone we contacted for suggestions said it was a good idea and that they were all in support of our initiative. All the more good reasons to be excited. 

But one frank comment we received from was another uncle. He thought our idea was good but doubted its survival because he said even the private newspapers were going through difficult times. He seemed right. That's why we decided to put our temptation on hold.

But even if Druk Outlook lives to see the light of the day, we understand the need of the market. We understand the cost factor. We understand students. We understand the market. We understand the paper quality. We understand the content quality. And we know how much a magazine should cost. That only time will tell.  


Comments

  1. hey man.i may be another uncle or cousin of yours.the idea isnt that bad.from what i have observed, entertainment stuffs seem to sell.magazines with less writeups and more pretty pictures get sold out in a few days..maybe 2 days. YEEWONG was sold out in 2 days. I guess same happened with DRUK TROWA.Both had lot of pretty pictures and less writeups. so you need to look at that side of content.paper and print quality should never be compromised with(this is a magazine afterall).so i guess u will need a lot of pretty pictures and less but good writeups.ofcourse u arent told to copy others. do "whatever works".

    oh by the way watch that movie "whatever works".nothing to do with magazines though

    good luck and i hope your magazine will hit the book stands .

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Anon...thanks for the suggestions. But I think it will be some time before we embark on that venture - a daring one in deed.

    ReplyDelete
  3. How come I didn't know about this idea of yours? I would have my say here too.

    Anyway, waiting to hear about...

    I have chosen set of Good Writers for you already!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Look look who is on the cover page..ha ha ha
    Everybody, the girl in the illustration is Penstars Darling...

    ReplyDelete
  5. I like your idea very much and its great too. As you said, its all about the sustainability.

    If you do not mind, I want to know whom you are targetting. What its really about?

    Otherwise, there are so many magazines flooding in the market but I wonder whether these magazines get sold or not. I want to know what will be so special with your magazine than others do not have so that your magazine can have your niche market and readership? I think ypu need to do really research on this (I know you might be doing but I am reminding beacuse I like your idea whom I want to support if I ever can).

    By the way, your book has been sold out in DSB. Actually I wanted to buy and my foreigner friends too. So where can i get your book yo buy?

    If you really go ahead with the project, I would love to contribute too.

    However, great idea , and as you know, every thing great starts with the idea conceived in the head.

    Good days ahead!!!

    ReplyDelete

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