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A Disturbing news yet again


Education Ministry's exemplary move to transfer Thimphu's senior most teachers to dzonkhags other than Paro and Phuentsholing, is disturbing piece of news. Maybe the ministry is fully awake now. And maybe the ministry is sending message of equity and justice here. But what will be the effect on  those 34 listed teachers' morale and dedication? What will happen to their teaching enthusiasm? 

Most of these senior teachers have served in remote places prior to their posting in Thimphu. And if that is the case, then their justification to continue to teach in schools in Thimphu hold water. After all, isn't it the government's policy for teachers to be posted to remote areas prior to their posting in urban areas? 


Hopefully, these teachers may not take to resignation. If they do, it is a great loss to the country. I personally didn't like some teachers from remote areas saying that  there are thousands willing to teach even if these 34 teachers resign.


I am tempted to quote here an excerpt from what I wrote on Kuzuzangpo.com in 2007:

But one thing is certain. There is always this difference in the quality and experience of teachers. As we move farther away from the urban zones like Thimphu, Paro, Phuntsholing, and Punakha, it is a decreasing trend. We see it with our own eyes. Compare the quality of English of students in remote areas like Pemagatsel and urban places like Thimphu. The gap is simply ‘sky and earth’.

Our observation is: a new and fresh teacher is posted to a remote area. Here he gets the feel of his new career and starts to learn many new things. When the teacher becomes ‘experienced’, as they call it, he is called to urban places like Thimphu. He is given the chance to make impact in good schools like Yangchenphug, Motithang and Luntgenzampa. They have a reputation of being the best in the country and it is only right that they require experienced teachers!

But now it seems we are setting a trend. A teacher may serve a few years in remote schools. And after that marry a civil servant and get posted to Thinphu; teach in the capital for 20 years, but when the ministry plans to send them to dzongkhags (other than Paro and Pling), they will resign. 

I don't know whether sending all these teachers away from Thimphu is a solution. But I am sure the ministry would come out with a better proposition. 

Comments

  1. Hmm...I am not quite sure what you are saying is good. But like you said, teachers do get married to civil servants and then they remain in the capital their entire career-life. I think it is a good decision to send some experienced teachers to remote areas. If they take it so narrowly and resign, I don't know if they will be doing the right thing. I personally feel that they should take that as a chance to serve the country in even better ways.

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