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Whose business?

This is none of my business, but I was shocked of RSTA director's comments to Bhutan Times on Sunday 25th October, 2009, where he said that more and more Bhutanese people are availing loans from the banks to buy cars. And having to pay back the bank is affecting the family economy. He went on to say that families are facing difficulties in repaying. the loans. The director was also quoted as saying: "In the past past most Bhutanese preferred to walk, but now they want the luxury of car, and this has deteriorated their health."

That's true. An increasing number of Bhutanese thinks that cars are no more luxury it was thought a decade or so ago. And to do that people borrow money from the banks. I guess that's how banks make money - through loans. That's how banks earn revenues for the government. For the governments pay civil servants.

I understand we must find ways to curb traffic congestion, but whether a family is unable to pay back the loans or is in a position to buy scores of BMWs, is none of our business.  Whether someone is healthy or not, is  not in my business to worry. And deteriorating quality of Bhutanese people's health in correlation to increasing number of cars is a general statement. It might be true, but there are no official records at least in Bhutan. Thank God!

Maybe RSTA officials could show us all some good examples by selling all their office vehicles to walk for health. At least the number of cars on the road will be less by a few vehicles. And some of us will give up the idea of availing loans to follow their examples. 

Offer some solutions to the problem and don't just make some general statements. On reaching the mountaintop, don't just claim the climb was the easiest.

Comments

  1. "Let them rain."

    Bhutanese will keep buying cars irrespective of any condescending man throwing flail comments like a spineless paralyzed arm.

    Good fight!

    ReplyDelete
  2. If you got time I suggest you publish a small book on 'goof-ups' in the Bhutanese Land. From the mindless bans to the boisterous rantings of our seniors. I am calling it small, but who knows it might turn out to be quite big. I am game for humors and what better than to look back and laugh at our own people :)

    ReplyDelete

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