Oct 16, 2009

Being a Prince or Princess

The other afternoon, I was talking to one of my friends. Obviously he must have gone through my blog.

“So, you are getting married huh?” a bold question.

“Yeah,” I tell him. “After all I am not growing any younger.”


“Yes that’s true,” he agrees. “Congratulation! When is the wedding?”


“Dorji, I don’t believe in ceremonies,” I tell him. “When we move out together we are married.”

“I mean formally marrying,” he clarifies.

“You see, I am neither a prince nor a celebrity figure.”


Today marriages are synonymous with pomp, power and wealth. Today the number of loaded bank accounts and cars to park in your garage determines the amount of recognition of your marriage receives. It is display of dignity and social status. It is an occasion of course to boast to the world that you are getting married to so and so, who is the daughter or son of so , an influential man in the government or a business tycoon. The couple no doubt needs people’s wishes and prayers for an eventful life ahead but today if you carefully observe a marriage feast can actually feed a village in Africa for a day or two especially the lavish ones.

So why have it at all?

Marriage is symbolic. It is commitment, a heart meeting a heart.

“I understand all that,” my friend tells me. “But if you know this, you don’t have to be a prince or a celebrity … you are already a prince and a celebrity figure to someone.”

Indeed. You are a prince and a celebrity. Very striking indeed!

Maybe: It is a celebration of joy, creating happier moments for pleasant memories. It is reaffirmation of faith and responsibility. It is the proclamation that you are finally bound to someone else for life. And I am a humble person and a humble man marries a humble woman as the rule of the game.