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Heavy holy change nyagchang

There was a heavy downpour towards evening yesterday. Maybe the Gods and goddesses in heaven thought that our bodily ‘dirt’ and souly ‘misdeed’ accumulated over the past two years deserved more than a regular drizzle. Today, for the first time, I feel more leansed. But too sad, just a day before they could actually take this holy bath many people lost their lives to unpredictable calamities. How uncertain can our lives get? All our prayers go to all those that were the victims of September 21 earthquake. May their souls rest in peace!

Two years’ ago, our government decided to write off Thrue Bab from the government holiday’s list. And when they did that they completely broke one of the pillars of GNH – preservation of culture and traditions. Now they realized the significance to call back the day to its former glory. It is a great relief to us all provided another government does not decide to slash it off again.

A few days ago news of simplifying Dzongkha flooded Bhutanese media. I remember a time when the government decreed that the Dzongkha we learn in the schools must be nyaggchang (pure) and all that. Look now – even Dzongkha lopons across the country seemed to agree. I hope they don’t change their minds soon. I think the only reason we have national language or any language for that matter is to provide people with a common medium of communication. Our important officials in the ministries stress the significance of Dzongkha in their lecture to school children and public gathering when they themselves prefer talking in English.

Everything is in a constant flux in Bhutan. First there was Dzongkha Development Commission, which became Dzongkha Development Authority only to be changed to Dzongkha Development Commission.This is an evidence in itself.

Four or five years later, if the government chooses to slash off Blessed Rainy or change DDC into DDA or mandate Bhutanese students to learn Dzongkha nyagchang we won’t be surprised.

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