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Fighting RCSCE-phobia

Now that the orientation is over, graduates all over Bhutan would be hunting for information and scratching through all our history books. And in absence of readily available information, it is going to be so frustrating for many. There are are aspirants like Tashi.P Ganzin who are already seeking divine intervention- whether to appear or not to. 

This is the biggest moment in a graduate’s life – it’s time to learn and relearn so many things about the home and the world. And they need good attention from their parents and relatives, guidance and advice from elders. I am sure all 1300 graduates who attended the NGOP may not appear RCSC Common examination, but we need to inspire and encourage those that brave the odds.
Many of my friends are waiting to take the exam of their life – their future will either be made or broken when RCSC declares the results. And my full prayers and support are with them. They are terribly afraid of it to say the least.
I heard while there are no problems in the writing section of the paper, viva-voce is really terrible. The interview panel makes you do so many weird things. For instance, “how do you say: I am really hungry, please give me some food – in Sharchop?” for someone who is foreign to that language. I also heard the interviewees are made to speak in Hindi. Now that does not make sense.
But whatever it is, I wish all the graduates best preparation. And I hope you would go to right institutions for right information. The Center for Bhutan Studies has a lot of information that you might need and likewise GNH Commission would be able to give you so much. Contact Kuensel and BBS, I heard they have very good information reservoir. I would visit Public Library in Thimphu or those in the east, Sherubtse College has good library. But all school libraries would really help. And I would read Kuensel and Business Bhutan (well that’s the latest newspaper) – and google out some writing tips. I also heard they are giving course specifically designed for those appearing RCSC exams, at Institute of Management Studies, Olakha. Might prove helpful!
Not really to advise those appearing the exams, but rather as a consolation to myself for having missed the opportunity.

Comments

  1. thanks for mentioning me in ur blog. i am really honored to be there whatever the reason.

    well thanks for the advice as well i m sure it's help all the grads appearing for the RCSC exams.
    G'day

    ReplyDelete
  2. Nice piece of advice you have posted for our grads. Not bad i should say.

    Well, about your missing opportunity i personally do not think there is much to regret about nawang. You are doing just fine as we mates see it and i am sure you will keep doing finer in life. I will be the last person to be surprised if after a decade or so YOU are the MD of your banking firm. Good luck and Tashi Delek.

    Check me out @Tsheringpenjo.blogspot.
    Have not posted anything intersting, however, if would give me few suggestions, it will help me move ahead on the web. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete

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