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And she is still waiting


It is been a year since she has been waiting. And knowing that he won’t come, she still waits. Somehow she cannot get off the feeling that he would come and save her. How easily could someone who promised her moon and stars change? How could he be so heartless to let her undergo a series of pains and heartaches? Today she misses her absent mother and the dead father more than ever.

Phuentsholing is a strange place. And survival threw her into different places and people, working for an Indian jewelry shop to waiter at a small hotel to a parking fee collection.

As far as her memory goes back, she has been working for one family or another. And the family she had been working for a year ago was by far the best people. After the death of her father, her mother remarried and ran away with a man.

When she thought she was learning to forget the absence of her mother, this man came along and promised her a colorful life. She decided even if she has nothing to eat, if there was someone who truly loved and cared her, she thought it was reason enough.

When she decided to leave the family, they were depressed. They didn’t want her to leave. But for her that was only possible excuse to come out of the shadowy life and live it real. To the family’s utter dissatisfaction, she ran away.

Having spent a night together at a restaurant in Thimphu, her lover bought her bus ticket to Phuentsholing. As the bus departed, the man promised her that he would be with her that very night. And in case he did not make up on the same day, she was to expect him the next day.

The next day she tried to contact him, but his cell phone was permanently switched off. Maybe he now has a new number.

And she is still waiting.

Comments

  1. Is this a true story Penstar? And do you know the girl? I wish we could help.

    I don't know whom to blame or if at all anyone is to be blamed! Keep us updated marey.

    Nice weekend.

    ReplyDelete

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