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Can Thimphu accomodate us all?

Most of the graduates attending the orientation program are employed either permanently or temporarily. And by definition of being employed, you have jobs to do, assignments to complete and deadlines to meet. Real orientation starts only on September 8, yet graduates should make themselves available from August 24, 2009. Now which boss do you think will grant you leave for 26 days? DoNW is the only one I can think of now. Who cares about the roadblocks and landslides? Who gives a damn whether Thimphu is ready to accommodate all graduates for nearly a month?

Verification of academic transcripts starts from 24th? Now I am sure no graduates will have the guts to attend the orientation without academic transcripts unless he/she is making total fun of the system. Ok … we agree it is to verify and validate the academic transcripts. It’s important for everyone to be verified. And the feeling that you are actually entitled to attend the program, I guess, is also important.

Now while the verification makes sense, the whole purpose of orientation is lost if the organizers refuse to entertain those without original academic transcripts. It is a shame - a program that promises to acquaint graduates with our culture and tradition? I believe, even if those youth on the streets are interested to join the graduates to learn our age old traditions and laws and policies, they must be given free entrance. But again, seriously how many people are interested in attending such lectures on something you have lived all your life?

But why is there so huge a gap between the verification process and real program? Whoever has planned the program, their kidneys must have overworked. Too bad, our officials thought all 1900 graduates live in Thimphu to be readily available whenever called.

Now those graduates stationed in places like Phuentsholing or Trongsa or Bumthang are forced to make two journeys for one purpose – first to let officials verify their mark sheets and second, the orientation itself. If Thimphu can accommodate all, of course there is no point in making one-time journey twice, but only at the cost of making our capital a little noisier and its streets less safe to walk at nights.

This time of the year, the media is infested with landslides, roadblocks and flooding river news.

Comments

  1. This is a time where we have to really research on our family tree.

    By hook or crook, one should, and must, land up becoming a pest, what they say, for more than two months or more at relatives' home, close or distant...

    ReplyDelete

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