Skip to main content

Can Thimphu accomodate us all?

Most of the graduates attending the orientation program are employed either permanently or temporarily. And by definition of being employed, you have jobs to do, assignments to complete and deadlines to meet. Real orientation starts only on September 8, yet graduates should make themselves available from August 24, 2009. Now which boss do you think will grant you leave for 26 days? DoNW is the only one I can think of now. Who cares about the roadblocks and landslides? Who gives a damn whether Thimphu is ready to accommodate all graduates for nearly a month?

Verification of academic transcripts starts from 24th? Now I am sure no graduates will have the guts to attend the orientation without academic transcripts unless he/she is making total fun of the system. Ok … we agree it is to verify and validate the academic transcripts. It’s important for everyone to be verified. And the feeling that you are actually entitled to attend the program, I guess, is also important.

Now while the verification makes sense, the whole purpose of orientation is lost if the organizers refuse to entertain those without original academic transcripts. It is a shame - a program that promises to acquaint graduates with our culture and tradition? I believe, even if those youth on the streets are interested to join the graduates to learn our age old traditions and laws and policies, they must be given free entrance. But again, seriously how many people are interested in attending such lectures on something you have lived all your life?

But why is there so huge a gap between the verification process and real program? Whoever has planned the program, their kidneys must have overworked. Too bad, our officials thought all 1900 graduates live in Thimphu to be readily available whenever called.

Now those graduates stationed in places like Phuentsholing or Trongsa or Bumthang are forced to make two journeys for one purpose – first to let officials verify their mark sheets and second, the orientation itself. If Thimphu can accommodate all, of course there is no point in making one-time journey twice, but only at the cost of making our capital a little noisier and its streets less safe to walk at nights.

This time of the year, the media is infested with landslides, roadblocks and flooding river news.

Comments

  1. This is a time where we have to really research on our family tree.

    By hook or crook, one should, and must, land up becoming a pest, what they say, for more than two months or more at relatives' home, close or distant...

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

So what do you think?

Popular posts from this blog

Utpal Academy - Bhutan's first All-girls High School

Welcome to Bhutan’s first all-girls school. Isn’t that wonderful news to all our parents? Certainly, as a parent of a one-year old daughter I am excited about the coming of a school exclusively dedicated to the needs of girls. Our girls need special treatment, which we can for sure entrust the responsibility to Utal Academy, Paro.
I really like the name – Utpal – in Buddhist world, Utpal is another name for lotus flower, which is believed to grow from mud and yet blossoms into a beautiful and majestic flower. It stands for purity and many deities are depicted holding flower Utpal, more prominently Jestusn Dolma, the Goddess Tara. Symbolically, it also stands for the transformation of our girls. What an apt name for the school!
The Principal’s message posted on the academy’s website promises providing our young women an “opportunity to participate fully in a wide range of extracurricular activities to develop skills and qualities that will lead to successful and fulfilling life.” That’s…

Our throw-it-away culture

Like all grandparents, my late grandma would call food 'tsampa rimpoche' and any fuss made about it would invite everyone's sneer and scoldings. Food is always treated with respect and is never wasted. "If you waste food in any manner," she would admonish us. "One day food will discard you and you will go hungry." 
What remained from the previous meal would be turned either into porridge or sometimes leftover rice would be dried in the sun. The dried rice would then be fried into puffed rice and consumed with cups of suja. When there was so much food left, especially during big events, leftover rice or kharang would be mixed with a small amount of yeast and brewed into ara.  
The only thing that I can vividly recollect from my primary school days is how we would be hungry most of the time. Food we were served was hardly enough to tickle our throats. We would be sent home only once a week on Saturdays and that was our opportunity to replenish our popcorn s…

Bloggers are not journalists

To say bloggers are not journalists is to say oranges are not carrots. Bloggers are not journalists. That’s true. But can bloggers become journalists? Maybe. Can journalists be bloggers? Yes. In fact, it would be only proper and appropriate for journalists to blog their opinions as opposed to being 'politically' correct all the time. So why call oranges carrots when they are what they are?
Well, it is true – bloggers have no training in journalism. That’s why they are bloggers. And for the same reason they are  not journalists. No bloggers have ever claimed what they blog can qualify as ‘journalism’.  We all do what we love the most and give our best in whatever we are doing either reporting news or blogging. 

Journalists do it as careers. Bloggers do it (mostly) for hobby and out of passion. Most journalists also do it with great passion - that's true. The journalists get paid for doing their jobs while bloggers derive pleasure doing it. Journalists cover (report) stories eve…